nerdynarwhal07
laboratoryequipment:

Superbug-Slaying Robot Employed at Canadian HospitalShe’s just 5’5” and quiet, but don’t let her demure looks fool you — she’s a ruthless killer who moves at the speed of light. Meet Tru-D, the newest member of Vancouver General Hospital’s (VGH) Housekeeping and Infection Control teams.Tru-D SmartUVC, or “Trudi” as staff affectionately call her, is a superbug slaying robot being piloted at VGH for the next few months. The machine disinfects surfaces with a measured dose of ultraviolet (UV) light to kill germs and viruses, such as norovirus, influenza, C. difficile, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE).Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/02/superbug-slaying-robot-employed-canadian-hospital

laboratoryequipment:

Superbug-Slaying Robot Employed at Canadian Hospital

She’s just 5’5” and quiet, but don’t let her demure looks fool you — she’s a ruthless killer who moves at the speed of light. Meet Tru-D, the newest member of Vancouver General Hospital’s (VGH) Housekeeping and Infection Control teams.

Tru-D SmartUVC, or “Trudi” as staff affectionately call her, is a superbug slaying robot being piloted at VGH for the next few months. The machine disinfects surfaces with a measured dose of ultraviolet (UV) light to kill germs and viruses, such as norovirus, influenza, C. difficile, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE).

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/02/superbug-slaying-robot-employed-canadian-hospital

nerdynarwhal07
nerdynarwhal07:

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo: MSF doctor Christoph Hoehn and nurse Gulru Nobodieva examine a nine-month old baby in Dushanbe, Tajikistan. sTajikistan 2013 © Christoph Hoehn/MSF
Tajikistan: MSF Treats its Youngest-Ever Patient with Multidrug-Resistant TB
“Shirinmo is not the youngest child we have seen with tuberculosis, but she is the youngest patient we have diagnosed with MDR-TB,” says Dr. Christoph Hoehn of MSF, which opened its children’s MDR-TB project in Tajikistan in late 2011. “Babies have a high risk of developing these diseases because their immune system hasn’t fully matured,” he says.
MSF has started formulating MDR-TB drugs specifically for children at a pharmacy in Dushanbe. Until now, there were no MDR-TB formulations on the market for children, who had to take drugs produced for adults—usually large, hard-to-swallow pills with a very unpleasant taste. MSF staff created a child-friendly syrup by dissolving the drugs in a flavored liquid, which is measured into appropriate doses for babies and adolescents. Tajikistan is the first MSF project where this formulation is being used to treat young patients, including Shirinmo.

Tuberculosis is thought by many to be an antique disease, one that afflicted people in the early twentieth century. However, tuberculosis (especially in its drug resistant forms) still ravages many parts of the world - included many regions of Africa. 

nerdynarwhal07:

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo: MSF doctor Christoph Hoehn and nurse Gulru Nobodieva examine a nine-month old baby in Dushanbe, Tajikistan. sTajikistan 2013 © Christoph Hoehn/MSF

Tajikistan: MSF Treats its Youngest-Ever Patient with Multidrug-Resistant TB

“Shirinmo is not the youngest child we have seen with tuberculosis, but she is the youngest patient we have diagnosed with MDR-TB,” says Dr. Christoph Hoehn of MSF, which opened its children’s MDR-TB project in Tajikistan in late 2011. “Babies have a high risk of developing these diseases because their immune system hasn’t fully matured,” he says.

MSF has started formulating MDR-TB drugs specifically for children at a pharmacy in Dushanbe. Until now, there were no MDR-TB formulations on the market for children, who had to take drugs produced for adults—usually large, hard-to-swallow pills with a very unpleasant taste. MSF staff created a child-friendly syrup by dissolving the drugs in a flavored liquid, which is measured into appropriate doses for babies and adolescents. Tajikistan is the first MSF project where this formulation is being used to treat young patients, including Shirinmo.

Tuberculosis is thought by many to be an antique disease, one that afflicted people in the early twentieth century. However, tuberculosis (especially in its drug resistant forms) still ravages many parts of the world - included many regions of Africa. 

nerdynarwhal07
shoulderblades:

chromogenic print of an atom-bombed dress, ishiuchi miyako, 2008
miyako photographed clothing and accessories left behind by victims of the 1945 atomic bombing of hiroshima. 

“from the 19,000 items made available to me [at the hiroshima peace memorial museum], i chose things that at one time had touched skin and bodies, and photographed them…. a flower-patterned dress colourfully dyed. a puff of gathered, shiny skirt woven of silk thread. cool-looking, thin, gorgeous materials that once shed the summer heat. used kimonos transformed into blouses and cut to make air-raid hoods…. these objects, exposed to the heat and radioactive rays of a fire ball that suddenly appeared one summer morning, and relinquished by the victims of the atomic bombing, have been on earth as long as i have. when i came to realize the coincidence,i caught my breath at their vivid hues and distinct textures, their flaws and complicated detail. these are too deeply linked to daily lives to regard as ‘historical materials.’”

shoulderblades:

chromogenic print of an atom-bombed dress, ishiuchi miyako, 2008

miyako photographed clothing and accessories left behind by victims of the 1945 atomic bombing of hiroshima. 

“from the 19,000 items made available to me [at the hiroshima peace memorial museum], i chose things that at one time had touched skin and bodies, and photographed them…. a flower-patterned dress colourfully dyed. a puff of gathered, shiny skirt woven of silk thread. cool-looking, thin, gorgeous materials that once shed the summer heat. used kimonos transformed into blouses and cut to make air-raid hoods…. these objects, exposed to the heat and radioactive rays of a fire ball that suddenly appeared one summer morning, and relinquished by the victims of the atomic bombing, have been on earth as long as i have. when i came to realize the coincidence,i caught my breath at their vivid hues and distinct textures, their flaws and complicated detail. these are too deeply linked to daily lives to regard as ‘historical materials.’”